CategoryUseful Knots

Occasionally, I like to learn and demonstrate new knots.

Bush Camping & Knot Instruction

New Video @ Outdoor Adventurecraft on YouTube!

In part one of the video, Jesse my brother in law and I head out for a night in the bush. We cook up some grub, have a drink, relax and get plenty of smoke in our eyes. It was a great night! Come along and join us!

In the second part of the video I get down to business demonstrating the Double Fisherman’s Bend, the Prusik Knot and the Lark’s Head Knot. If you would like to skip straight to the knot portion of the video you can scroll to 9:09 in the video and get right to it. It’s up to you, but you’ll miss a great night in the bush.

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A Chance to Get Away from it All!

It’s nice to escape, even if just for a while! I had an opportunity to get away for the night to do some bush camping, so I took it! It was totally worth it, what a great night! I also took the opportunity to show you fine folks a few more knots.

Join me for a night out in the bush. I promise you will enjoy! Welcome back to Outdoor Adventurecraft.

Hiking In

Being in the Boreal Forest in Canada, our woods truly can be referred to as bush. Thick undergrowth and dense softwood can make travel difficult at time.

Semi-Permanent Shelter

After a little hike in we arrive at my semi-permanent shelter.

Rub a Dub Dub, let’s Cook up some Grub!

You guy’s n gal’s know I love my gruel. This night was no exception. Some deer steak and maple beans were the main course of the evening. I fried up the steak in olive oil and Montreal steak spice, then cut it up into the maple beans. It was heavenly but as Jesse noted, had the appearance of dog chow! Hey, it’s not always about what it looks like, it’s all about how it tastes!

Deer Steak

After fighting with wet wood and finally getting a decent bed of coals, we cook up some grub, deer steak and maple beans! Delicious!

Eating Deer Steak and Beans

Eating our dog food…er… I mean beans and steak! It did however look a tad like dog food, good thing it tasted amazing.

Waking Up is Hard to do!

With a full belly and a little whisky in us, dealing with the smoke burning our eyes out didn’t even seem that bad. It was still nice to eventually get to bed, and climb into the embrace of a gently rocking hammock. We shot out of bed the next morning at the crack of dawn! No not really, it was 9:30 before we got up. Life is hard in the bush.

Hammocks among fir

We stayed up pretty late despite the smoke burning the eyes out of our heads, so these comfy hammocks were very welcome.

Flint and Steel

Got another opportunity to practice my primitive fire making skills.

Purifying Water

I set my shelter about 150 feet back from a small river. It’s nice to have water close by.

To the Business at Hand…

So after waking up… slowly… and getting some breakfast and a hot beverage, I set about the instructional portion of the trip. I had after all come out here to create new content for my YouTube channel. It can’t be all fun and games, can it? So I set about showing a few more knots that could be useful for setting up a tarp on a ridge line. Basic stuff I know, but fundamentals are important.

If you’d like to see how to set up a good taut ridge line before you set up a tarp on it, check my article here… https://outdooradventurecraft.com/two-ideal-ridge-line-knots/

Demonstrated in this session are the Double Fisherman’s Bend, the Prusik Knot, and the Lark’s Head. Together with a good taut ridge, these knots are ideal for helping set up a tarp.

Double Fisherman's Bend

To make a loop for use in the Prusik Knot, the double Fisherman’s bend works well.

Prusik Knot

The Prusik Knot has been a long time favorite of mine for rigging tarps among other things.

Lark's Head

Here we see the Lark’s Head form after creating it.

Lark's Head Use

The Lark’s Head can be used to hold a button rock or toggle in place in a tarp for easy set up of shelter.

All in all it was a productive and relaxing night escape. Good food, good drink, and good times… what more could you ask for?  See you next time.

Thanks for joining me here on Outdoor Adventurecraft!

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Two ideal ridge line knots

Two knots that I personally love for tying up ridge lines are the anchor hitch/bend and the alpine butterfly. When combined these two knots provide an ideal high tension ridge line that doesn’t bind and can be easily untied.

Now you can use any number of knots to tie up a line but I personally use these two mainly because of the ease of untying them and I’m able to remember them… lol.

This picture shows a completed Anchor Hitch or Bend it’s also called.

anchor bend knot

The anchor hitch or bend is an ideal high friction knot

Here’s a look at the first major step and then the completed Alpine Butterfly.

Alpine Butterfly setup

The starting setup for the Alpine Butterfly as demonstrated in the video below.

complete alpine butterfly

The Alpine Butterfly when finished. Its a pretty knot actually.

First attach your line to one tree with the anchor hitch, then use the alpine butterfly to tension the line at the other tree and complete by finishing with a second anchor hitch. You can see this demonstrated in my video here…

Please forgive a few errors in terminology. The formation of the knots and demonstration were completely accurate… In a few instances however, when going “under” part of the knots, I was saying underhand. In reality when you bring your working part “over” the standing part, even if you then go “under” and through, you started by going underhand. I’m sure you can see how it can be a bit tricky to use exact term every time. I always want to be as clear as possible. I will improve and get better with each video in this series.

Thanks for joining me here on Outdoor Adventurecraft!

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http://www.youtube.com/c/outdooradventurecraft
http://www.facebook.com/outdooradventurecraft
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My new Series, “Introduction to Knots”

Join me as I introduce my new series, “Introduction to Knots”. This beginner’s series is designed to help me learn and share with you a variety of simple knots. I’m really just getting started myself. I know just enough to get by. I hope to change that with this series and share some of what I learn. We can learn together!


This opening video focuses on terminology and how it applies to learning to tie more advanced knots as the series progresses. Stay tuned as the series applies itself to knots practical for use in a woodland setting.

Thanks for joining me here on Outdoor Adventurecraft!

Get more Outdoor Adventures on YouTube, Facebook and Instagram…

http://www.youtube.com/c/outdooradventurecraft
http://www.facebook.com/outdooradventurecraft
http://www.instagram.com/outdooradventurecraft

See ya soon!

 

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